And the Winners are…

A short story is a love affair; a novel is a marriage. A short story is a photograph; a novel is a film.
~ Lorrie Moore

Stephen King writes: A short story is a different thing all together – a short story is like a kiss in the dark from a stranger. 

Our winners reflect both these concepts.

John Crain of Cerrillos, has had professional careers in the fine arts, astronomy, and computer science. Between those unraveling strings of time in which he is forced to make money, he writes short stories, poems, and novels having to do with multiple universes. His short story, Forgiveness, appears in Las Vegas Lit’s collection, Tapestry: Tales, Essays, Poetry. His Elmer Schooley Short Story, I Saw You in a Dream Last Night, captured in less than 1,000 words the essence of the Schooley image and took the story in a different direction, reminding readers what dreams can be made of.

Pam Lewis, of Los Ranchos, states on her author page that she was born in Burbank but moved frequently because of her father’s career path in the aviation industry. The family settled in New York City long enough for Pam to attend high school. A shy, observant girl, “a little too tall too soon,” she excelled at school when she finally set her sights on Stanford University and squeaked in on so-so grades. She is mom to two adult children.

As is true of many creatives, she has worked at a little of this and a little of that. “On the cusp,” she writes, “of her 59th year, her first book was taken by Simon and Schuster, then a second and now, with the publication of A Young Wife, a third. 

Her story for the Elmer Schooley Short Story Contest, Sometimes it’s Out of Your Hands, met the requirements of the call with writing excellence, and a tight mystery with a mere 1,150 words.

Mary Rose Henssler spent most of her life in Nevada in the small town of Battle Mountain, Henderson, neon lit Las Vegas, and other places and other states. She and husband, Bob, two dogs and a cat have found their roots at a rambling home surrounded by prairie just outside Las Vegas in New Mexico. She majored in play writing at Vermont College of Norwich University and studied script writing and voice over at UNLV. Two of her plays have been performed. Publication credits include poetry in now defunct literary magazines and a chapbook of political limericks. She writes and enjoys drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, and being outdoors. Her story, The Hat, tells a tale of promises kept. She has several pieces in Tapestry.

Announcement of the winners and presentation of awards took place at the closing reception of the June Art Show and Sale, an event curated by Las Vegas Arts Council president, Richard Lindeborg. Proceeds from art sales went to support other nonprofit agencies in Las Vegas: Friends of the Montezuma Hot Springs, Hermits Peak Watershed Alliance, Las Vegas Literary Salon, Las Vegas Arts Council, MainStreet de Las Vegas, Animal Welfare Coalition of Northeastern NM , NMHU Foundation Lindeborg Fund and Collection Fund.

Artists represented included: Elmer Schooley, Dia Atman, Ellen Koment, Pamela Bounds-Seeman, Mary Beth Pizzoli, Eugene King, Eloise Lindeborg, Gail Malley, June Bowers, Ray Drew, Lina Valdez, Ethel Kriechbaum, Lucy Finch, Lee Weber, R.C. Gorman, John Gavahan, D. Chase Keightley, Clayton Lewis, Ralph Bowyer, M. Craig, Carol Dahl, Scott Vail, Ray John de Aragon, Rosa Maria Calles

The winners each received $300. Mary Rose Henssler chose to donate here prize back to the Literary Salon. The three winning stories will be published in a spring/summer anthology scheduled for release in time for the holidays 2023.


Las Vegas Literary Salon is a nonprofit organization under the fiscal sponsorship of Las Vegas Arts Council. For more information about how you can become involved, email lvliterarysalon@gmail.com. We are seeking active creatives.

SEEKING SHORT STORY ENTRIES

WHAT DOES THIS ELMER SCHOOLEY PRINT CONJURE UP IN YOUR WRITER’S MIND?

If you enjoy writing short stories, this is for you. The Elmer Schooley Short Story Prize is a writing competition sponsored by the Las Vegas Literary Salon, made possible by the generous donation from Lorenzo Martinez of four Elmer Schooley prints. The print seen here has been chosen by the Las Vegas Literary Salon to be the subject of short story entries. We’re looking for good writing and creative panache!

Image

What does this image conjure in your mind? Write that in a short story of 2,000 words or less and submit. Three cash prizes will be awarded. Prize-winning stories and qualifying submissions will be those that best reflect the hidden stories behind the image. Qualifying submissions among non-winners will be included in an Elmer Schooley Short Story Prize Anthology along with the top three winners. Authors included in the anthology will receive one free copy of the book. Click on Call for Submissions in the menu to download the Submission Guidelines.

Three of the four prints by this well-known artist will be available for sale as part of a fundraising initiative for Las Vegas Literary Salon. One has already sold for $2,000. The buyer wishes to remain anonymous. For details about the available prints, contact lvliterarysalon@gmail.com.

Elmer “Skinny” Schooley (February 20, 1916 – April 25, 2007) was an American painter and printmaker. He received a BFA from the University of Colorado, and an MA at the State University of Iowa. Schooley was a Professor of Art and Head of the Department of Arts and Crafts, New Mexico Highlands University, Las Vegas, New Mexico. His works are included in collections at the Library of Congress, Metropolitan Museum, Museum of Modern Art, among others.

The image above and the two below are available for purchase. The items are valued from $1,500 to $2,500. Funds raised from sale of the items will go to support Las Vegas Literary Salon projects, including the Elmer Schooley Short Story Prize and publication of an anthology of qualifying entries. A portion also goes to our fiscal sponsor, the Las Vegas Arts Council to support its ongoing efforts to showcase and promote art in all its forms.