Blanche brings historic figure to life

On Sept. 18, Deborah Blanche, widely known for her portrayal of notable women from history, will be part of the New Mexico History Museum’s day-long public celebration of Nina Otero-Warren, one of four remarkable women to be represented on quarters released by the U.S. Mint. The free event runs from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Click here for a complete list of activities. Deb’s La Nina Chautauqua begins at 1 p.m. in the museum auditorium.

Nina Otero-Warren, champion of education, and advocate for cultural preservation, will be celebrated with talks, special activities, and entertainment. Otero-Warren was a leader in New Mexico’s suffrage movement and the first female superintendent of Santa Fe public schools.

Deb, as Nina, invites the audience into her library on the occasion of her 70th birthday. There she reminisces and confides, answers, and disclaims, takes you back on the campaign trail of 1922, shares some of her pandemic experiences, even tells stories from her book Old Spain in Our Southwest. Ever provocative, she also raises questions about why women have not yet been written into the US Constitution; the inequities in health, labor and education for Native Americans and Hispanics; and the role of the arts, language and culture in education.

Deb, an accomplished writer and actress, is a member of Las Vegas Lit Salon.

Patti Writes

Hello Readers and Bloggers and Writers:

I’m taking a bit of a break this month-end to prepare for my Lit Salon Talk: Reading and Writing Historical Fiction, featuring my novel, Prairie Madness, Conspiracy at Fort Union.

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On Sunday, July 24, 2022, 4 p.m MST, the Las Vegas Literary Salon will sponsor what I hope and plan will be a lively Zoom discussion of the genre: its forms, content, excitement, frustrations, research methods, rewards … (You may fill in your own experiences as readers/writers.)

Hope to hear from you on July 24, with your questions and comments. The zoom link is https://us02web.zoom.us/j/4635856164. Registration is not required but helpful. Go to this link to register https://lvnmlitsalon.org/events-2/

Edwina Romero aka Patti Writes


I plan to attend
Lit Salon Talk: Reading and Writing Historical Fiction


Patti Writes: A Circle of Light

“Is it time yet?” I whisper loudly. ‘In a stage whisper,’ Nanna would say.

I am poised with the red table lamp, its cord dangling from the outlet between the two kitchen windows, in one hand, and my library book under my arm. In the small bedroom off the kitchen, Ma is crooning gently to Denise, the baby. Ronnie’s silence means he is staring intently at Ma’s lips. Denise babbles. Then a sigh, like at the end of a long hard day at the factory. And Ronnie whispers ‘good night, Mum.’

Soon after, Ma slowly backs out of the ‘kids’ room, silently closing the door to within the width of her hand.

I know not to breathe or the spell will be broken.

Then, I scramble through the open window onto the screened-in back porch, while Ma pours two juice-sized glasses of milk, then assembles our butter and saltine cracker sandwiches. I set the lamp on the box between two low-slung beach chairs. The cord is just long enough, actually, taut, and I switch on the light. My job done, I lie back, book on my lap, and watch the outlines of the houses on Marion Street melt away, and dots of lights appear in their windows. As darkness claims day, the lamp’s bulb creates a bright circle of light, an oasis, big enough to include us, our snacks, and books. I love this.

Balancing our goodies on Nanna’s old wooden tray, Ma enters the porch through the doorways—kitchen door to back-hall to porch door to porch. She transfers plates and glasses to the box and returns to the kitchen. In my mind, I see her stack the tray beside the toaster and begin the search for her book.  

I wait.

She returns.

We establish ourselves in our chairs—scootching around for comfort. It is hot summer in East Boston and sticky humid. “Not a breath of air,” Nanna’s voice says in my head. City sounds are lazy—a dog bark, a car horn, a kid’s laugh, the brief smack-thud of a moth trying to get through the screens.

My mother always claimed she was tricked into agreeing to move to this flat on the top floor of my grandfather’s three-story apartment building on busy Meridian Street. As she told and retold it, she and Daddy stood in the empty kitchen with its brass fittings and grey, double soapstone sinks, and Dad said, “Look Reta, a big back yard for the kids.”

“It was dusk,” she’d say to me. “No screens. Who could tell that our so- called big back yard was actually the neighbor’s?” Our flat had only this back porch, screening added later against the moths, overlooking the back yards of other houses.

 Our building had no back, side, or front yard. But we had this circle of light and reading, reading in the night on the back porch together.

This memory sustained me through entrance exams, essay tests, comprehensive exams, dissertation defense, and even conference papers as I adjusted the microphone and the reader’s circle of light on the podium.


Read here to learn more about Las Vegas Literary Salon’s Elmer Schooley Short Story Prize writing contest. Cash prizes of $300 each to the top three submissions and an opportunity to be included in the contest’s short story anthology of qualifying entries. Download Submission Guidelines here. Short Story Contest submission deadline changed to July 1.

PATTI WRITES

A FEW FAVORITE WORDS ABOUT WORDS

Helen Keller sums it up: “Literature is my Utopia.”

Carl Sagan amplifies:

What an astonishing thing a book is. It’s a flat object made from a tree with flexible parts on which are imprinted lots of funny dark squiggles. But one glance at it and you’re inside the mind of another person, maybe somebody dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, an author is speaking clearly and silently inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people who never knew each other, citizens of distant epochs. Books break the shackles of time. A book is proof that humans are capable of working magic. (Cosmos, Part 11: The Persistence of Memory, 1980)

From a Poet: “I know nothing in the world that has as much power as a word. Sometimes I write one, and look at it, until it begins to shine.” Emily Dickinson

From a Master of Suspense: “She was fascinated with words. To her, words were things of beauty, each like a magical powder or potion that could be combined with other words to create powerful spells.” Dean Koontz, Lightning.

Many thanks to David Pascale for sharing his collection of words on words.


PATTI WRITES: Edwina P. Romero is a founding member of Las Vegas Literary Salon. She has authored several books including her novel, Prairie Madness, Conspiracy at Fort Union. For more about Patti, click here.

Patti Writes

PHOTO: DAVID PASCALE

Hello and welcome to Patti’s blog – all things [except for the occasional digression] books, reading, writing… Yes, I am one of the founding members of the Las Vegas Literary Salon (LVLS). One – maybe distant – day, we will bring Salon activities, i.e., book fair, salon talks (with refreshments) to the streets, or at least one of our streets, or maybe a store front… And, coming soon, the LVLS publication: Northeastern New Mexico Tapestry: Poetry, Essays, Tales. See Call for Submissions here. In the mean time, be sure to join us for Visits with the Author via Zoom, each fourth Sunday at 4 p.m.

Today’s blog features a sampling (Tiger’s Pics) of books by and for Las Vegans. Yes, Tiger was born and abandoned somewhere on the outskirts of town.

Some books are about Las Vegas, some are not. Troll through and find your pic. Many are available locally.

Paper Trail, 158 Bridge St., (505) 454-1337; Books of the Southwest, 247 Plaza, 505 469-0517; Brotique 505, 707 Douglas Ave, www. Brotique505.com.

So Long and Thanks for All the Fish, Douglas Adams.
Patti

What is the Literary Salon

Howdy! We’re glad you’re here

Sharon Vander Meer

Las Vegas Literary Salon hosted its first event Sunday, July 12, thanks to the Las Vegas Arts Council and the Las Vegas NM Community Foundation. The event was a delayed launch because of the pandemic. Originally, thanks to a Mustard Seed grant from the First United Presbyterian Church, the first event was to be a poetry workshop in April featuring Carolyn Martin.

After waiting for life to get back to normal, which clearly wasn’t happening soon enough for us, Patti Romero and I, founders of LVLS, decided to make use of Zoom technology to get LVLS up and running. With the encouragement and help of LVAC’s Susie Tsytee, we produced a Writers & Readers Roundtable featuring five authors. It was well attended for our first foray into the digital world and gave us much-needed encouragement to continue.

Thanks to our guests, author Ray John de Aragon, poet Joy Alesdatter, historian Tim Hagaman, poet Kathleen Lujan, and writer/performance artist Beth Urech, we saw the potential for more.

Since then we have had an event each month through November and will return to programming in January with Toby Smith, author of Crazy Fourth: How Jack Johnson Kept His Heavyweight Title and Put Las Vegas, New Mexico, on the Map.

This is the launch of our website, which is very much a work in progress. Click on Guest Roll for a brief bio and contact information for previous LVLS guests.

Going forward, we will continue with A Visit with the Author, and expand on workshops, like the one conducted by Carolyn Martin. We’re looking for ideas, so if you have a topic you would like us to explore, or a presenter who LVLS might invite, or suggestions for improvement to the site, please let us know by filling out the contact form below.

There is no cost for participants or audience members. We want to thank the LVNM Community Foundation and the Las Vegas Arts Council for their encouragement and support. And thanks to the First Presbyterian Church of Las Vegas for its Mustard Seed Grant, which allowed us to resubmit the grant request with revised deliverables. With the grant, we will purchase a one-year Zoom license and get this website off the ground. The remaining grant funds will be used to published a collection of short stories and poems by regional writers. But, that’s a story for another day.

LVLS events are generally held from 4-5 p.m., the fourth Sunday of the month. Registration is required so we may send you a Zoom invite specific to the featured guest or program. In the future, we hope to switch to in-person activities. Until then, our programming is digital.

Please share this post with your friends who love writing and reading. We’re excited about the future of Las Vegas Literary Salon. If you would like to become a member, click on the Contact tab and provide us with your email address. We will send you notification of upcoming events. We also invite you to follow this website so you don’t miss any of our posts.

A special thanks to Jim Terr who has generously edited some of our videos. We appreciate the donation of his time and expertise.

The Las Vegas Literary Salon Team
Sharon Vander Meer
Patti Romero
Mary Rose Henssler